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Mar 12, 2021

Weekly Immigration Round-Up: Public Charge Rule Terminated; Foreigners Previously Barred from U.S. Can Reapply for Visas; Venezuelans Granted Temporary Protected Status

End of the 2019 Public Charge Rule

On Tuesday, March 9, 2021, the Biden administration asked the Supreme Court to dismiss the government’s appeals of court decisions against the “public charge” rule, which had expanded the ability of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to deny green cards to lower-income immigrants. » Read More

Mar 04, 2021

Completing Form I-9: Employees With Extended Work Permit for DACA Extensions and Extensions for Permanent Resident Cards

Applicants for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) receive a work permit in the form of the Employment Authorization Document (EAD), which is subject to timely renewal. Owing to COVID-19, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is facing substantial delay in processing EAD applications. » Read More

Jan 21, 2021

Online Tools to Decrease Wait Times in Immigration During COVID

Owing to the pandemic, federal immigration agencies are facing significant delays in processing various immigration applications. On January 8, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) acknowledged delays in processing as the result of COVID-19 restrictions, increases in filings, and current postal service volume and other factors. » Read More

Jan 19, 2021

USCIS Announces Delays in Biometric Appointments Due to COVID-19

Earlier this month, U.S. immigration authorities provided the first-ever update about the situation at Application Support Centers, when United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced delays in issuing receipt notices for some applications filed at the USCIS lockbox facility. In a sense, the agency’s issues date back almost to the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, when in-person services at USCIS offices were canceled from March to June of 2020. » Read More

Jan 08, 2021

Weekly Round-Up: Visa Restrictions Extended; DNA Testing for Sponsors of Noncitizen Minor Children; Stricter Financial Requirements for Intending Immigrants Take Effect

Trump Administration Extends Restrictions on Visa Applications for Foreign Workers

The White House has extended through March 31, 2021, restrictions on visa applications and entry into the United States for certain foreign national workers. The restrictions had been set to expire on December 31, 2020. » Read More

Dec 15, 2020

Federal Judge Orders DACA Reinstated, New Applications Accepted

On November 14, 2020, United States District Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis of the Eastern District of New York reinstated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which is now accepting new applications. DACA protects eligible immigrant youth who entered the United States as minors and have accrued unlawful presence. » Read More

Dec 10, 2020

Facebook Faces Lawsuit Alleging Discrimination Against U.S. Workers

On December 3, 2020, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it had filed a lawsuit against Facebook Inc., alleging discrimination against U.S. workers. This lawsuit, construed as a new push against tech companies by the administration, alleged that Facebook reserved positions for skilled workers with temporary work visas. » Read More

Dec 08, 2020

Long-Awaited Green Card Bill S.386 Clears Senate Approval

On December 2, 2020, the Senate passed bill S.386, the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2020. The Senate reached unanimous consent, and the bill was passed as amended. This Act would lift caps on the number of immigrants who can be approved for permanent residency permits (“green cards”), making significant changes to the employment green card system. » Read More

Dec 01, 2020

Revised U.S. Citizenship Test Harder for Immigrants

On November 13, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced changes to the U.S. citizenship test that lawful permanent residents must pass to naturalize as U.S. citizens. The revisions have increased the number of questions from 100 to 128. Immigrants will be tested on 20 of the questions and must answer 12 correctly, up from six out of ten. » Read More