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COLA

Feb 07, 2019

ABC Relaxation of COLA Requirement for Intrastate Sales

Relax.  You may not always need a COLA to register your brand in New Jersey.

In a prior post, we talked about the need to obtain a COLA for New Jersey brand registration per New Jersey regulations, even if the brand is sold intrastate only, or just in your taproom (and therefore would not require a COLA under federal law).  » Read More

Sep 24, 2018

I’m Exempt from COLA Registration and Only Sell My Product in My State – Am I Exempt from Formula Approval?

In prior posts, we discussed whether federal Certificate of Label Approval (“COLA”) approval was necessary to obtain state label approval in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, even if the product is sold exclusively in your state.  We also discussed when the use of certain ingredients in beer triggers the need for formula approval.  » Read More

Nov 08, 2017

How Can a Brewery Produce Hard Cider? – Part 2: COLAs, Standards of Fill and Pa.L.C.B. Brand Registration

Hard cider (or alcoholic cider as it is commonly called) has been around for centuries, especially in Pennsylvania.  Being home to many apple orchards, Pennsylvania is starting to see numerous cideries (like a brewery, but for hard cider) popping up anywhere from apple orchards and farms to urban centers.  » Read More

Aug 21, 2017

Pa.L.C.B. Changes Procedure on Brand Registration for Breweries

UPDATED:

Effective January 1, 2018, the Pa.L.C.B. is only requiring a COLA to be obtained from the TTB, and filed with the Office of Malt Beverage Compliance, for brand registration if the brands will be sold to licensees, including restaurants, hotels, distributors, clubs and other manufacturers.  » Read More

Apr 21, 2017

TTB Releases Results of Annual Sampling Program: Many Common Label Violations Can Easily Be Avoided

Each year the TTB conducts its Alcohol Beverage Sampling Program where it randomly purchases products to assess whether their labels comply with federal regulations and to test whether their contents comply with the information identified on the label (e.g. that the beer in a bottle labeled as 5.0% ABV is within the applicable tolerance, which is generally ± .3% ABV for beer). » Read More

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